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"Healthy habbits"

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«"Healthy habbits"»

Eyes Open 3 Grade 7

TERM 3 Unit 5

Long-term plan unit: 5 READING FOR PLEASURE

School: Altynsarin

Lesson 1


Date: 10 01,2019

Teacher’s name: Kabdualieva

CLASS: 7 е,ж,з

Number present:

absent:

Theme of the lesson: Introduction. Charles Dickens’ biography

Learning objective (s) that this lesson is contributing to

7.1.2.1- use speaking and listening skills to provide sensitive feedback to peers;

7.1.3.1- respect differing points of view;

7.4.2.1- understand specific information and detail in texts on a range of familiar general and curricular topics;

Lesson objectives

All learners will be able to:

Most learners will be able to:

• read a biography of Charles Dickens.

• learn vocabulary for describing important periods during lifetime

• practise guessing the meaning of vocabulary from context.

Some learners will be able to:

Success criteria

Give feedback to others orally

Demonstrate respect to people’s opinions using lexical units of topic vocabulary

Identify details in a text with little support

Value links

Labour and creativity, cooperation

Cross curricular links

Kazakh, Russian

Plan

Stages of the lesson

Planned activities (replace the notes below with your planned activities)

Teacher’s notes

Greeting


Greet students; students respond to greeting and take their places.

Hello, boys and girls! How are you?


Unit presentation

Background



A theatrical adaptation of Charles Dickens’ Great Expectations was put on at the Vaudeville Theatre in London in 2013. The photograph is a still from it, and shows the English actress Paula Wilcox as Miss Havisham. Wearing her wedding dress and

standing alongside her sunken wedding cake, Miss Havisham, one of the most well-known characters in English literature, is the image of lost hope.


Warm up

• Books closed. Write character on the board. Ask: What is a character?

Elicit the answer: a person represented in a novel, film or play. Elicit examples of well-known characters from Kazakh literature, e.g. figures from folklore such as Aldar Kose and Zhalmauyz Kempir, and twentieth-century characters such as Berdibek Sokpakbaev’s Kozha.

• Ask students to open their books at page 56.

• Refer students to the photograph and the three questions.

• Put students into pairs and give them a couple of minutes to answer the questions.

• Elicit ideas about the character shown in the photograph. Then explain that the character is called Miss Havisham and that she appears in a novel called Great Expectations.

Suggested answers


The dress suggests that the woman is not living in the modern period. The dress she is wearing and the room she is in create the impression of wealth, but also of a life that is not going so well. Perhaps the woman is unhappy. The expression on her face suggests that she is very sad.


Additional Information

Differentiation - how do you plan to give more support?

Assessment - how are you planning to check learners` learning?

Health and safety check ICT links

More support will be given to weaker learners by giving them a modified worksheets in some tasks with greater support

-through questioning and the redirecting of questioning in feedback activities

-through observation in group and end performance activities

-through formative task



-Health promoting techniques

-Breaks and physical activities used.

-Points from Safety rules used at this lesson.

REFLECTION


Answer the most relevant questions to reflect on your lesson.

Were the lesson objectives/learning objectives realistic?

What did the learners learn? What did/didn’t you like? What was difficult?





Long-term plan unit: 5 READING FOR PLEASURE

School:

Lesson 2


Date:

Teacher’s name:

CLASS:

Number present:

absent:

Theme of the lesson: Great expectations. Part I

Learning objective (s) that this lesson is contributing to

7.4.4.1- read a limited range of extended fiction and non-fiction texts on familiar and some unfamiliar general and curricular topics;

7.4.8.1- use familiar and some unfamiliar paper and digital reference resources with little support to check meaning and extend understanding;

7.6.2.1- use a growing variety of quantifiers for countable and uncountable nouns including too much, too many, none any, enough;

Lesson objectives

All learners will be able to:

Most learners will be able to:

• talk about the past of a character from Great Expectations.

• read an extract from the Great Expectations.

Some learners will be able to:

Success criteria

Figure out the content of a short text with some support

Clarify the meaning of the word in a dictionary or other digital references

Apply the correct quantifiers including too much, too many, none any, enough for countable and uncountable nouns in the context

Value links

Labour and creativity, cooperation

Cross curricular links

Kazakh, Russian

Plan

Stages of the lesson

Planned activities (replace the notes below with your planned activities)

Teacher’s notes

Greeting


Greet students; students respond to greeting and take their places.

Hello, boys and girls! How are you?


Warm up

Warm-up

• Books closed. Write Charles Dickens on the board. Elicit anything students know about the man.

• If students do not recognise the name, say that Dickens was the

most popular English-language writer of the mid-nineteenth

century, and that many of his characters remain well-known,

e.g. Oliver Twist, The Artful Dodger, Ebenezer Scrooge, Wilkins Micawber.


Practice

1 • Ask students to open their books at page 57. Focus their

attention on the photograph of Charles Dickens.

• Ask students to read the biography and complete the fact file. Students can compare answers in pairs before you check them with the class.

Answers

1 1812 2 London 3 journalist 4 1836 5 Catherine

Hogarth 6 1836 7 novels 8 1870


A novel

1 • Write Great Expectations on the board. Point out that this

novel, published in 1861, is one of Dickens’ most famous works.

• Elicit or teach that to have an expectation of someone, means to believe that they will achieve something.

• Read out the questions and make sure students understand that the character Pip is the one telling the story.

• Students read the text and answer the questions.

• Check answers.

Answers

1 three (the young lady, the boy and the strange lady)

2 in a dark house; it isn’t an attractive place – Pip refers to

being ‘uncomfortable’ and ‘afraid’. He says ‘no daylight

was allowed to get in’.


2 • Read out the four items.

• Put students into pairs to discuss what they think will come next in the story.

3 • Students read the first two paragraphs in the next part of the story to check their answer to Exercise 2.

• Ask students the impression we get of the woman from the way Pip describes her. At first we get the sense of something clean and pure – everything is white, jewels ‘lay shining on the table’. But then the mood changes. The woman is only wearing one shoe, the wedding dress she is wearing is not white, but ‘faded and yellow’.

Answers

a description of a person

a conversation between two people

Additional Information

Differentiation - how do you plan to give more support?

Assessment - how are you planning to check learners` learning?

Health and safety check ICT links

More support will be given to weaker learners by giving them a modified worksheets in some tasks with greater support

-through questioning and the redirecting of questioning in feedback activities

-through observation in group and end performance activities

-through formative task



-Health promoting techniques

-Breaks and physical activities used.

-Points from Safety rules used at this lesson.

REFLECTION


Answer the most relevant questions to reflect on your lesson.

Were the lesson objectives/learning objectives realistic?

What did the learners learn? What did/didn’t you like? What was difficult?





Long-term plan unit: 5 READING FOR PLEASURE

School:

Lesson 3


Date:

Teacher’s name:

CLASS:

Number present:

absent:

Theme of the lesson: Great expectations. Part II

Learning objective (s) that this lesson is contributing to

7.4.4.1- read a limited range of extended fiction and non-fiction texts on familiar and some unfamiliar general and curricular topics;

7.4.8.1- use familiar and some unfamiliar paper and digital reference resources with little support to check meaning and extend understanding;

7.6.1.15- use infinitive forms after a limited number of verbs and adjectives; use gerund forms after a limited variety of verbs and prepositions on a growing range of familiar general and curricular topics

Lesson objectives

All learners will be able to:

Most learners will be able to:

• practice using the past simple to talk about what happened in the novel

• read an extract from the Great Expectations.

• answer the questions.

Some learners will be able to:

Success criteria

Figure out the content of a short text with some support

Clarify the meaning of the word in a dictionary or other digital references

Apply some abstract nouns and complex noun phrases in the context

Value links

Labour and creativity, cooperation

Cross curricular links

Kazakh, Russian

Plan

Stages of the lesson

Planned activities (replace the notes below with your planned activities)

Teacher’s notes

Greeting


Greet students; students respond to greeting and take their places.

Hello, boys and girls! How are you?


Warm up

• Refer students to the word and phrases in the box. Check their understanding of the vocabulary. Make sure students can pronounce veil /veɪl/.

• Students then read the whole of the second part of the

story and make a note of which items in the box Miss

Havisham is wearing.


Answers

a wedding dress, flowers, a veil, an expensive necklace; she’s only wearing one shoe, not a pair; her watch and gloves are

next to the mirror.

Practice

Your turn


• Ask students to look at the photograph of a bride.

• In pairs, students compare this photograph with the description of Miss Havisham in the extract from Great Expectations, noting both the differences and the similarities.

• Check answers.

Answers

Similarities: they are both wearing a wedding dress; they are both wearing a veil; they both have flowers

Differences: Miss Havisham is wearing flowers in her hair, but the bride is holding flowers; Miss Havisham’s clothes are old and yellow, but the bride’s clothes are white; Miss Havisham is wearing a necklace, but the bride isn’t; Miss

Havisham is old, but the bride is young; Miss Havisham is very thin, but the bride is healthy


• Put students into pairs to discuss the question of what Pip finds in the other room.

• Elicit ideas and put them on the board.

• Ask students to read the next part of the story to check their answers.


Answers

He finds her wedding cake, but it is very old.

Additional Information

Differentiation - how do you plan to give more support?

Assessment - how are you planning to check learners` learning?

Health and safety check ICT links

More support will be given to weaker learners by giving them a modified worksheets in some tasks with greater support

-through questioning and the redirecting of questioning in feedback activities

-through observation in group and end performance activities

-through formative task



-Health promoting techniques

-Breaks and physical activities used.

-Points from Safety rules used at this lesson.

REFLECTION


Answer the most relevant questions to reflect on your lesson.

Were the lesson objectives/learning objectives realistic?

What did the learners learn? What did/didn’t you like? What was difficult?





Long-term plan unit: 5 READING FOR PLEASURE

School:

Lesson 4


Date:

Teacher’s name:

CLASS:

Number present:

absent:

Theme of the lesson: Miss Havisham’s story

Learning objective (s) that this lesson is contributing to

7.5.3.1- write with moderate grammatical accuracy on a limited range of familiar general and curricular topics;

7.5.4.1- use with some support style and register appropriate to a limited variety of written genres on general and curricular topics

7.4.8.1- use familiar and some unfamiliar paper and digital reference resources with little support to check meaning and extend understanding

Lesson objectives

All learners will be able to:

Most learners will be able to:

• write about her clothes, appearance

• predict what they think will happen

• write about the past of a character from Great Expectations

Some learners will be able to:

Success criteria

Write with moderate grammatical accuracy on a limited range of familiar general and curricular topics;

Use with some support style and register appropriate to a limited variety of written genres on general and curricular topics

Clarify the meaning of the word in a dictionary or other digital references

Value links

Labour and creativity, cooperation

Cross curricular links

Kazakh, Russian

Plan

Stages of the lesson

Planned activities (replace the notes below with your planned activities)

Teacher’s notes

Greeting


Greet students; students respond to greeting and take their places.

Hello, boys and girls! How are you?


Warm up

The ball game (5 minutes)

• Play this game with the whole class.

• Students take it in turns to hold a ball. While holding the ball

they say a word, e.g. spider.

• They then throw the ball to another student who has to use that

word in a sentence or with a phrase.

• If this student makes a correct sentence, he or she then chooses

the next word and throws the ball to a new student. If not, he or

she drops out and the ball passes to his or her neighbour.

• The last students left is the winner.


Practice

Put students into pairs to discuss the question of what Pip finds in the other room.

• Elicit ideas and put them on the board.

• Ask students to read the next part of the story to check their

answers.


Answers

He finds her wedding cake, but it is very old.


Read out the information in the Get reading box. Tell students that using context to guess the meaning of new vocabulary is a very useful skill – it encourages students to see how the meaning of a word is dependent on those it is used with. A word can have many (sometimes contradictory) meanings, which can only be understood by an analysis of the context that word is used in.

• Refer students to the items in exercise 7. Encourage students to examine the context for words 1–8 in the text and then match them to the best definition in a–h. Students can do this exercise in pairs or in small groups of three.

• When you check the answers, ask students to point out the part of the text containing the word in question, making sure that everyone understands how each of the words has been used.


Answers

1 c 2 h 3 f 4 a 5 e 6 b 7 d 8 g


• Refer students back to the photograph on page 56 of the actress portraying Miss Havisham.

• Ask students to work alone to decide whether the photograph is an exact match of the description in the text of Miss Havisham and her house.

• Students can compare their answers in pairs before you check answers with the class.

• You can extend this activity by asking students whether they think plays, TV dramas or films based on novels should follow exactly what is in the book or whether it is better for the ideas in the story to be re-imagined.


Answers

Similarities: Miss Havisham is wearing an old wedding dress;

she has a necklace; she is old and thin; the room is dark;

there is a wedding cake and it’s falling apart

Differences: the cake in the text is black; there are spiders in

the cake


Give students a couple of minutes to read through items 1–6.

• Students then work alone to read through the whole extract from Great Expectations.

• Students can work in pairs to choose the best answer in 1–6. Make sure they write the line of the text that helps them choose their answer.

• When checking answers, ask students to read out the part of the text that led them to their answer. For example, in item 1, the answer is a because of what we learn in this section: ‘And then she walked away – and took the candle with her. This was very uncomfortable, and I was afraid.’


Answers

1 a 2 b 3 b 4 c 5 a 6 b

Additional Information

Differentiation - how do you plan to give more support?

Assessment - how are you planning to check learners` learning?

Health and safety check ICT links

More support will be given to weaker learners by giving them a modified worksheets in some tasks with greater support

-through questioning and the redirecting of questioning in feedback activities

-through observation in group and end performance activities

-through formative task



-Health promoting techniques

-Breaks and physical activities used.

-Points from Safety rules used at this lesson.

REFLECTION


Answer the most relevant questions to reflect on your lesson.

Were the lesson objectives/learning objectives realistic?

What did the learners learn? What did/didn’t you like? What was difficult?





Long-term plan unit: 5 READING FOR PLEASURE

School:

Lesson 5


Date:

Teacher’s name:

CLASS:

Number present:

absent:

Theme of the lesson: My favourite writer’s biography

Learning objective (s) that this lesson is contributing to

7.1.6.1- organize and present information clearly to others;

7.1.7.1- develop and sustain a consistent argument when speaking or writing

7.5.3.1- write with moderate grammatical accuracy on a limited range of familiar general and curricular topics;

7.5.4.1- use with some support style and register appropriate to a limited variety of written genres on general and curricular topics

Lesson objectives

All learners will be able to:

Most learners will be able to:

• learn vocabulary for describing important periods during lifetime

• talk about people in the family

• practise using the past simple to talk about what happened in the author’s life

• talk about the author’s life

Some learners will be able to:

Success criteria

Demonstrate an ability to organize and express ideas clearly

Make an argument and evolve reasoning while speaking

Write a letter

Use with some support style and register appropriate to a limited variety of written genres on general and curricular topics

Value links

Labour and creativity, cooperation

Cross curricular links

Kazakh, Russian

Plan

Stages of the lesson

Planned activities (replace the notes below with your planned activities)

Teacher’s notes

Greeting


Greet students; students respond to greeting and take their places.

Hello, boys and girls! How are you?

Materials

• computer with Internet Access

• paper and pens for writing letters

• envelopes

• stamps

• student copies of “Letter to My Favorite Author”

Practice

After reading an extract, encourage your students to write letters to the author. While e-mail may be a quick means of communication, students also need practice in writing formal letters. By writing a letter to an author, students will take time to compose their thoughts and master the form of writing a letter.



All of us enjoy receiving comments about our writing. Authors want to know what you think about their books, too. Did you like the ending? Would you have written a different ending? Would you like the author to write a sequel?

1. Write a letter to the author of a story that you have just read.

2. In your letter, tell the author why you liked this book. Tell the author if you would like to read a sequel to this book.

3. You may wish to ask the author some of the following questions:

• How did you get the idea for this book?

• Did you model the main character after someone you know?

• How long did it take you to write this book?

• How much time do you spend writing each day?

• Do you like to write in the morning, afternoon, or evening?

• Do you write with pen and paper or do you use a computer to write your stories?



Ask students to find information about their favourite author using the Internet. Then in small groups get students discuss their favourite authors’ biographies or make mini-projects about their favourite author. Finally, ask students to present their projects and answer the class’ questions.


Homework

Set Exercises 1, 2, 3 and 4 on page 43 and Exercises 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 on page 44 of the Workbook for homework. For homework, ask students to do some more research into the life and work of Charles Dickens. Encourage students to read, listen to or watch some of Dickens’ stories. As Dickens’ stories have

been made into so many different versions – film, TV, animation, audio books – students should be able to find material online.


Additional Information

Differentiation - how do you plan to give more support?

Assessment - how are you planning to check learners` learning?

Health and safety check ICT links

More support will be given to weaker learners by giving them a modified worksheets in some tasks with greater support

-through questioning and the redirecting of questioning in feedback activities

-through observation in group and end performance activities

-through formative task



-Health promoting techniques

-Breaks and physical activities used.

-Points from Safety rules used at this lesson.

REFLECTION


Answer the most relevant questions to reflect on your lesson.

Were the lesson objectives/learning objectives realistic?

What did the learners learn? What did/didn’t you like? What was difficult?





Long-term plan unit: 5 READING FOR PLEASURE

School:

Lesson 6


Date:

Teacher’s name:

CLASS:

Number present:

absent:

Theme of the lesson: My favourite book

Learning objective (s) that this lesson is contributing to

7.1.2.1- use speaking and listening skills to provide sensitive feedback to peers;

7.1.6.1- organize and present information clearly to others;

7.1.7.1- develop and sustain a consistent argument when speaking or writing;

7.1.8.1- develop intercultural awareness through reading and discussion

Lesson objectives

All learners will be able to:

Most learners will be able to:

• practice using the past simple to talk about what happened in their favourite book

• answer the questions

Some learners will be able to:

Success criteria

Give feedback to others orally

Demonstrate an ability to organize and express ideas clearly

Make an argument and evolve reasoning while speaking

Raise awareness about cultural diversity through reading and discussion

Value links

Labour and creativity, cooperation

Cross curricular links

Kazakh, Russian

Plan

Stages of the lesson

Planned activities (replace the notes below with your planned activities)

Teacher’s notes

Greeting


Greet students; students respond to greeting and take their places.

Hello, boys and girls! How are you?


Warm up

You could provide them with a few key words such as ‘ghosts’, ‘country’, ‘encyclopedia’, ‘fairy tales’ and ‘thieves’. They then have to match the key word to the book on the shelf.



Practice

They could then make up their own titles – you could allocate one book to one group if time is an issue, if not it could be interesting to compare the different titles the groups come up with.

Once they have the original titles and have a general idea of the content of each of the books you can move onto which one would they want to buy and why? Remember at this stage their choice is only based on part of the cover.



You can lead on from this to do a pre-reading class survey. You could photocopy miniatures of this page and they could cut and stick onto the survey poster the book cover they like the best. You can even come back to this activity post-reading and compare to see if opinions have changed.



They could choose a story from the book and as a group write the continuation or end.

They can choose their favourite book at home and do a ‘show and tell’. This can actually make up a large proportion of your project. You can teach them language they need to express how they feel about a book they love with a few key adjectives. If you have a large class this could be done in groups. You could find out what sort of book they want to talk about and arrange the groups so that you have a selection of book types. You may find at this age that there are very similar tastes or a split with girls and boys. You could group together like-minded readers and together they decide why they all like that particular type of book. They could even try to write, as a group, a page long short story. This is obviously aimed at the older primary learners.

They could learn about different types (genres) of books and complete an updated version of the earlier class chart and see if they all still prefer the same genre of book as before.


Additional Information

Differentiation - how do you plan to give more support?

Assessment - how are you planning to check learners` learning?

Health and safety check ICT links

More support will be given to weaker learners by giving them a modified worksheets in some tasks with greater support

-through questioning and the redirecting of questioning in feedback activities

-through observation in group and end performance activities

-through formative task



-Health promoting techniques

-Breaks and physical activities used.

-Points from Safety rules used at this lesson.

REFLECTION


Answer the most relevant questions to reflect on your lesson.

Were the lesson objectives/learning objectives realistic?

What did the learners learn? What did/didn’t you like? What was difficult?





Long-term plan unit: 5 READING FOR PLEASURE

School: Altynsarin

Lesson 7 А,B.V.G


Date: 23-24.01.2018

Teacher’s name: Kabdualieva

CLASS: 7 А,B.V.G

Number present:

absent:

Theme of the lesson: My favourite character

Learning objective (s) that this lesson is contributing to

7.3.6.1- begin to link comments with some flexibility to what others say at sentence and discourse level in pair, group and whole class exchanges;

7.5.3.1- write with moderate grammatical accuracy on a limited range of familiar general and curricular topics;

Lesson objectives

All learners will be able to:

Most learners will be able to:

• talk about their favourite characters

• write about what they think happened in the character’s life

Some learners will be able to:

Success criteria

Interact in a pair, group and a whole class work presenting

Write description of a character with moderate grammatical accuracy

Value links

Labour and creativity, cooperation

Cross curricular links

Kazakh, Russian

Plan

Stages of the lesson

Planned activities (replace the notes below with your planned activities)

Teacher’s notes

Greeting


Greet students; students respond to greeting and take their places.

Hello, boys and girls! How are you?


Preparation

My favourite character

Draw your favourite character.




Write about your favourite character.

Write 5 sentences about your favourite character.

1. ___________________________________________

2. ___________________________________________

3. ___________________________________________

4. ___________________________________________

5. ___________________________________________


Distribute the template to the class and say that they are going to write about their favourite character.


Warm up

Have students read the lesson section 'Describe Appearance and Speech.' Model for students how you would write a paragraph about your book character's appearance and speech, using 'think aloud' statements and writing ideas on the board. Now think about your book character. What do they look like? How do they speak? Give students time to write a paragraph that addresses their book character's appearance and speech. They can also use the white paper and markers to draw an image of their character, and they can create speech bubbles to illustrate how their character talks.


Practice

Say, “Today we are going to talk about characters in stories and shows. A character is a person or animal that does things or has Corduroy by Don Freeman feelings or thoughts in the show or story. For example, Dora is one character in the show Dora the Explorer. Boots is another character in the show. Can you think of any characters in shows that you watch?"



After some sharing say, “Can you think of a favorite character in a book that you have read?" Mention some familiar stories or fairy tales to get the students thinking.



Prepare four index cards by writing the name of one character from the book on each card. Place them face down on the floor or table. Instruct one student to choose a card and say one thing about the character they have chosen. Continue until each card is chosen, then mix the cards up and repeat. Play as long as time permits.



Children can dress up as a character from a book! The student must provide the actually book or a card with the title and author. The student must be able to describe the character and share some of the character’s activities with the class. Provide students with a letter to their parent about dressing up like their favorite book character.


Additional Information

Differentiation - how do you plan to give more support?

Assessment - how are you planning to check learners` learning?

Health and safety check ICT links

More support will be given to weaker learners by giving them a modified worksheets in some tasks with greater support

-through questioning and the redirecting of questioning in feedback activities

-through observation in group and end performance activities

-through formative task



-Health promoting techniques

-Breaks and physical activities used.

-Points from Safety rules used at this lesson.

REFLECTION


Answer the most relevant questions to reflect on your lesson.

Were the lesson objectives/learning objectives realistic?

What did the learners learn? What did/didn’t you like? What was difficult?




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Предмет: Английский язык

Категория: Уроки

Целевая аудитория: 7 класс.
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"Healthy habbits"

Автор: Yusupova Dina Berdibaevna

Дата: 17.05.2019

Номер свидетельства: 510706

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